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Conference winners bring 18,000 experts to New Zealand

New Zealand’s Tourism Minister has recognised the efforts of 31 experts who have secured international conferences for the country for their work in helping grow New Zealand’s business, research and technology sectors.

The group, including university academics and health sector professionals, has championed their respective fields of expertise on the global stage to bring conferences to the country. The 25 conferences they have secured are expected to bring more than 18,000 international experts to New Zealand, as well as contributing an estimated $37million to the local economy.

The experts were celebrated at a national awards dinner in Auckland hosted by Tourism New Zealand. The 25 conference bids were supported through its Conference Assistance Programme, which is available to any internationally-affiliated association or organisation that wants to bid to host an international conference with a minimum 200 delegates in New Zealand.

Tourism New Zealand’s Chief Executive Stephen England-Hall says hosting international conferences delivers significant benefits for New Zealand and New Zealanders.

“The knowledge and experience they bring often sparks innovation which helps to improve outcomes for our own experts and their areas of focus.”

Speaking at the event, Tourism Minister Kelvin Davis said: “The Government wants to foster sustainable growth through innovation, technology and high-paying jobs. I believe international conferences provide a starting point for bringing real benefits to our business, research and technology sectors which has a flow on effect to all New Zealanders.”

One example of a conference that will have a positive impact on New Zealand is the World Conference of the International Lesbian, Gay Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association coming to Wellington in March 2019.

Kevin Haunui, who attended the event on behalf of Host Rōpū, Tīwhanawhana Trust, Intersex Trust Aotearoa New Zealand and Rainbow Youth, says bringing the conference to New Zealand will help build capability to advance human rights issues faced by Rainbow communities in New Zealand and the Oceania region.

“To bring a global contingent to this country presents an opportunity to share and discuss the human rights inequities and successes of Rainbow communities. It is also an opportunity to increase awareness of international political mechanisms to advance local issues.”